Citation(s) from the GunPolicy.org literature library

Rokaw, William M., James A. Mercy and Jack C. Smith. 1990 ‘Comparing Death Certificate Data with FBI Crime Reporting Statistics on US Homicides.’ Public Health Reports; Vol. 105, No. 5 (Sept/Oct), pp. 447-55. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 1 September

Relevant contents

Background and Definitions

Mortality system:…

NCHS [National Center for Health Statistics of the Public Health Service] receives death certificate data for national compilation directly from the States…

The death certificate does not include any information on the suspected perpetrator of a homicide, the relationship of a victim and a perpetrator, or the circumstances of the event leading to death…

FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation] uniform crime reporting system:…

Homicide is one of the seven major categories of crimes reported through this system

Each SHR form contains information on a particular homicide event, some of which may include more than one death. Information is included on the demographic characteristics of the person(s) suspected of committing the homicide as well as of the victims, the relationship of victim and perpetrator, and the circumstances of the event…

Mortality system homicide definition:

Homicides reported through the vital statistics system are classified according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) into two general categories, homicide and legal intervention [4]…

Crime reporting system homicide definition:

The FBI definition classifies deaths due to human action into three categories based on legal criteria. The first category, called homicide and nonnegligent manslaughter, is defined as "the willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another" [3a]. The second category, called justifiable homicide, is defined as "the killing of a felon by a police officer in the line of duty, or the killing (during the commission of a felony) of a felon by a private person" [3a]. The third category, called negligent manslaughter, is defined as "the killing of another person by gross negligence" [3b]…

Sources cited:
3) Uniform crime reporting handbook. Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC, 1984, (a) p. 6; (b) p. 9.
4) International classification of diseases, ninth revision, clinical modification. DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 8(}-.1260, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 1980, (a) p. 1042; (b) p. 1045.

ID: Q6537

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