Citation(s) from the GunPolicy.org literature library

Berman, Eric G and Louisa N. Lombard. 2008 ‘Indirect Transfers from Regional Armies and Armed Groups - Republic of the Congo.’ The Central African Republic and Small Arms: A Regional Tinderbox, pp. 63-64. Geneva: Small Arms Survey, the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. 1 December

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Indirect Transfers from Regional Armies and Armed Groups - Republic of the Congo

Although significant numbers of combatants did not cross into CAR from the Republic of the Congo, small arms and ammunition circulating in CAR are known to have originated in the state. Richard Carroll of WWF (US) noted that, between 1997 and 1998, there were indications that Kalashnikovs had come across the border with the Republic of the Congo after its six-month civil war ended in October 1997. He cautioned, however, that home-made hunting rifles and old Soviet 12-gauge shotguns - popular with expatriate hunters temporarily based in the country - remain by far the most common weapons found in the Dzanga–Sangha Dense Forest Special Reserve. Many of the safari hunters do not take their weapons with them when they leave the country.

Allard Blom adds that, while most guns confiscated during anti-poaching initiatives were old Baikal shotguns (with a few German Mausers also known to be circulating), some new ones, including Kalashnikovs, have cropped up, suggesting that this trade continues.The weapons are most often used for poaching. A popular 12-gauge shell used in the Baikal and other shotguns in Sangha-Mbaéré prefecture are reportedly produced in RoC and marketed.

These shotgun shells, reportedly manufactured in a facility in Pointe Noire, have appeared as far away as Vakaga prefecture. It is believed they are transported by boat to Bangui and then conveyed overland throughout the country.

[CAR = Central African Republic; RoC = Republic of the Congo]

ID: Q5243

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