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Gun Policy News, 3 June 2010

United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Agence France Presse

A British taxi-driver declared "there's going to be a rampage" just hours before launching a shooting spree that left 12 people dead, and then turning the gun on himself, reports said Thursday. Derrick Bird, 52, also wounded 11 people, three of them critically, as he drove through the picturesque Lake District region of northwestern England taking pot shots at passers-by from the window of his car. Police warned local residents and the many tourists who flock to the... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Agence France Presse

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Associated Press

A British taxi driver killed his twin brother and a family lawyer when he went on a shooting rampage in rural England, leading to speculation that a family dispute could be at the root of the horrific violence. Derrick Bird, 52, has been identified as the man who shot 12 people to death and wounded 11 others over a three-hour period, before killing himself on Wednesday. British authorities had originally reported that 25 people had been wounded, though Home Secretary... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Associated Press

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

CNN

LONDON, England - The shooting spree by taxi driver Derrick Bird across Cumbria, northern England has brought painful reminders of other mass shootings in the UK. The UK already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the world, introduced in the wake of two infamous UK mass shootings. In 1987, Michael Ryan, 27, killed 16 people in the southern English town of Hungerford, Berkshire, as he went on the rampage for several hours armed with a pistol, a hand grenade... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: CNN

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Time (USA)

On Wednesday morning, taxi driver Derrick Bird went on a shooting spree in the rural region of Cumbria in northwest England, killing 12 people and injuring 11 others. The massacre began near the village of Lamplugh at 10 a.m., when Bird, 52, shot and killed his twin brother David. Over the next three hours, he drove from village to village in the beautiful Lake District region with his shotgun and .22-cal. rifle, cutting down people at random. Then he drove to his... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Time (USA)

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

BBC News

Derrick Bird, who shot dead 12 people in Cumbria, held a firearms licence for 20 years, it has emerged. Cumbria Police said the taxi driver had a shotgun certificate and a firearms licence for weapons, and he is understood to have been a licensed firearms holder since the age of 32. Deputy Chief Constable Stuart Hyde said the two weapons they had recovered from Bird, a shotgun and a rifle, appeared similar to those described on the licences, but that officers would... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: BBC News

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Guardian (UK) / Comment is Free, Opinion

Yesterday's killings in Cumbria have already been compared with Hungerford and Dunblane, Britain's two previous rampage killings. Now there are three. But while such incidents are undoubtedly very rare, they are not completely unknown and if we shift focus slightly – murder/suicide incidents are rather more frequent. A lot of the media speculation has been asking why did he do it? There are certainly profile issues here; commonalities with Hungerford and Dunblane –... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Guardian (UK) / Comment is Free

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Independent (UK)

Britain is one of the most regulated countries in the world when it comes to owning guns. Shotguns, rifles and handguns are each treated differently under the law, with shotguns the easiest to obtain and handguns, after Thomas Hamilton's massacre in Dunblane, the most difficult. Licences are needed to own either shotguns, which must have a minimum barrel length and which fire shot, or firearms, which shoot either bullets or pellets in single rounds. Shotgun and... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Independent (UK)

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Scotsman (Edinburgh)

Britain's firearms licensing is among the toughest in the world. After the Hungerford Massacre in 1987 the Conservative government passed a the Firearms (Amendment) Act of 1988 which banned semi-automatic and pump-action rifles. Registration was also required for shotguns, which had to be kept in secure storage. After the Dunblane Massacre in 1996, the Firearms Act was amended again by the Tories – so handguns above .22 calibre were outlawed. A Labour 1997 amendment... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Scotsman (Edinburgh)

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Independent (UK)

The day had begun in sunshine. The streets were filling up with families enjoying half-term, and Whitehaven was bright with the promise of summer. Then the first shots rang out. Within a few hours, 12 people lay dead, and this quiet Georgian port had joined the ranks of Dunblane, Hungerford and Omagh as geographic shorthand for mass murder. In the three-and-a-half hours from 10.35am, local taxi driver Derrick Bird, 52, was to unleash one of the most ferocious and... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Independent (UK)

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Guardian (UK)

The reaction to the Hungerford and Dunblane massacres has left Britain with an entrenched "anti-gun culture" and some of the toughest gun control laws in the world. The ban on handguns, following the Dunblane massacre in which a former scout leader, Thomas Hamilton, shot dead 16 primary school children and their teacher, has proved so tight that Britain's Olympic gun team has to train abroad for the 2012 Olympics. In 1987 Michael Ryan murdered 16 people, including his... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Guardian (UK)

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Guardian (UK)

Cumbria's deputy chief constable said his force had been stretched by the massacre that left one of Britain's smallest forces investigating one of the biggest mass shootings on UK soil. Stuart Hyde said: "Throughout the day we have been dealing with a very fast-paced operation that stretched over three hours, and emergency services responded during very difficult, challenging circumstances … thanks to the support of our colleagues at the Civil Nuclear constabulary and... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Guardian (UK)

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United States

3 June 2010

City Pages (Minneapolis)

"If there's an unequivocal opposite to growing up around guns," says Andrew Rothman, "it's being raised by New York Jews." He puts down his glass of water and wipes his dark goatee with a napkin. It would be quite the outlandish statement were he not talking about himself. "I grew up believing guns were bad," he continues. "That's what my parents taught me. But they also taught me to read. That was their first mistake." Rothman is the executive director of the... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: City Pages (Minneapolis)

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United States

3 June 2010

Los Angeles Times, Editorial

The Assembly approves a bill that bans the open carrying of unloaded firearms; the state Senate should do the same, and the governor should sign it. The open carry movement, an aggressive campaign asserting the right of all Americans to carry unconcealed firearms in public, operates under a simple premise spelled out in a banner headline on the opencarry.org website: "A right unexercised is a right lost." But in California, the opposite may well turn out to be true —... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Los Angeles Times

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United Kingdom

3 June 2010

Telegraph (UK)

Experts have called for Britain's gun licensees to be more tightly monitored after Derrick Bird, who held a firearms licence for 20 years, embarked on his killing spree in Cumbria. The taxi driver, 52, held a certificate for a shotgun and a firearms licence, though it has not been confirmed whether the two weapons found by police were those he had permission to carry. Lord Mackenzie, a former head of the Police Superintendents Association (PSA), told the BBC's Today... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Telegraph (UK)

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