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Gun Policy News, 24 November 2004

Iraq

24 November 2004

Associated Press

FALLUJAH, Iraq — U.S. Marine officers said Wednesday that U.S. and Iraqi troops sweeping Fallujah have uncovered enough weapons to fuel a nationwide rebellion and that clearing the former insurgent bastion of arms is holding up the return of civilians. Most of Fallujah's estimated 250,000 civilians left the central Iraq city ahead of the devastating Nov. 8 assault and "it will be probably several more weeks" before significant numbers of them can return, said Lt.... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — More than three years after the Sept. 11 attacks, air travelers still are trying to carry thousands of potentially deadly items on planes every month. The Transportation Security Administration, which took over security screening at 450 airports in February 2002, said Tuesday it had confiscated 15.6 million prohibited items, including 2,150 guns, 75,241 boxcutters and 4.7 million knives through the end of October. A 79-year-old woman was arrested... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Associated Press

HAYWARD, Wisconsin — The man suspected of shooting six hunters to death and a survivor agree that the tragedy began with a confrontation on private land. But they sharply differ on what happened next. Survivor Lauren Hesebeck told investigators Chai Vang, 36, of St. Paul, Minn., turned around after a verbal exchange and started shooting his rifle from 40 yards away. But Vang told Sawyer County investigators he began firing only after one of Hesebeck's hunting... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

New York Times

TULSA, Oklahoma — The Oklahoma Legislature considers guns and the workplace a good mix. This year, it approved by an overwhelming margin a law allowing employees to keep firearms in locked vehicles on company property, making Oklahoma the envy of pro-gun groups throughout the United States. A federal judge here and a group of prominent companies in Oklahoma, however, cannot stomach the mixture. Judge Sven Erik Holmes of United States District Court decided on Tuesday... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Washington Post, Opinion

A while back a federal court declared that the manufacturers of the most popular forms of peer-to-peer file-sharing technology are not liable for copyright infringement committed by people using their technology. Congress immediately sprang into action by taking up legislation to reverse the court's ruling. The goal is to make it clear that p2p manufacturers are indeed liable for copyright violations committed with their products. No doubt many hope this will drive the... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Philadelphia Inquirer

Philadelphia faces poverty and a strong drug trade. Advocates call for change to ease the problems. Within hours after 16-year-old Jalil Speaks died of a bullet wound to the chest, politicians and children's advocates looked for the cause, and many settled on guns. There are too many, and they are too easy to get, they said. What went unmentioned after the shooting Monday was that the gun laws in Philadelphia are the same as everywhere else in Pennsylvania. But in... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY — A new state law allowing employees to keep guns in their locked cars on company property has alarmed some of Oklahoma's biggest corporations and pitted them against gun enthusiasts. The law was passed by the Legislature earlier this year and was scheduled to go into effect Nov. 1, but a federal judge blocked its enforcement while he considers a challenge brought by companies fearful that guns at work could lead to bloodshed. Employers say the law... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

24 November 2004

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Wisconsin)

The man suspected of killing six hunters and wounding two others in northern Wisconsin was ticketed for trespassing while hunting in Green Lake County in 2002, according to documents. Chai Soua Vang, 36, a St. Paul, Minn., truck driver, was hunting with another man on April 7, 2002, when he was spotted trespassing at Badger Mining in Berlin, according to a report released Wednesday by the Green Lake County Sheriff's Department. Vang and the other man pleaded guilty... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Wisconsin)

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United States

24 November 2004

Asheville Citizen-Times (North Carolina), Letter

The same things that won America saved it again. Never before in our history has a president endured so much bashing from the left. Despite the news media's negative agenda toward President Bush, and despite all of the anti-Bush books and movies, the good people of this country have spoken with a loud voice against the perversion being crammed down our throats. Although the left is puzzled by this resounding victory, it is very simple. The same values that won this... (GunPolicy.org)

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Argentina

24 November 2004

La Nacion (Argentina)

"Pobreza, iniquidad y armas son un cóctel explosivo": Lo dijo la especialista Rebecca Peters - Sostiene que es mejor controlarlas que encarcelar a quienes las usan - Propone la reforma de las instituciones junto con un plan de desarme Detrás de un cuerpo enjuto, una mirada un tanto traviesa y sumamente agradable, y un español hablado con tono adolescente, se esconde una mujer combativa y persuasiva, una periodista que, enfrentada a la tragedia, hace ya 13 años,... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: La Nacion (Argentina)

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