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Gun Policy News, 11 October 2002

United States

11 October 2002

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Georgia), Editorial

Desperate police in suburban Washington, D.C., are attempting to track a deadly sniper through the vehicles he might be driving. Cars and vans can be traced; the high-powered rifle he is using cannot. It's not a matter of technology. The tools exist to track a bullet back to the weapon that fired it. But despite entreaties by law enforcement for a national database of "ballistic fingerprints," the National Rifle Association has blocked creation of this critical,... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Georgia)

51

United States

11 October 2002

Washington Post

One day after vowing to avoid the gun issue as long as a serial sniper is on the prowl, Democrat Kathleen Kennedy Townsend abruptly shifted gears and yesterday shipped a new ad to Washington TV stations that bashes her GOP opponent in the Maryland governor's race for voting against a ban on "assault weapons." In the 30-second ad, which is scheduled to begin airing today, the camera pans over an array of militaristic-looking rifles, then cuts to a man pulling a handgun... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Washington Post

52

United States

11 October 2002

Indianapolis Star (Indiana)

U.S. Attorney Susan Brooks implored a crowd of about 600 people — many of them community leaders — to join with law enforcement to stop what she called a deplorable increase in firearm violence. "Where is the outrage in the community? Where is the outrage to stop it?" Brooks said today at Marion County Sheriff Jack Cottey's "Turn off the Violence" prayer breakfast. Today is part of National Turn off the Violence Day, where businesses, schools and the community are... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Indianapolis Star (Indiana)

53

United States

11 October 2002

Associated Press

DENVER — Four videotapes made by the Columbine High School killers will not be locked in a secured evidence room, despite concerns by the teenage gunmen's parents that the recordings could end up in the hands of the media and influence copycat attacks. "In preparing a case for trial, you need to have the matters you will deal with to work on, and you need it in your office," U.S. District Judge Clarence Brimmer said in denying the parents' request Friday. Lawyers... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Associated Press

88

United States

11 October 2002

Christian Science Monitor, Opinion

The senseless shootings in the greater Washington, D.C., area show the US has a long way to go in controlling gun use by criminals. The states need to take a look at their sometimes complicated, and often difficult efforts to enforce gun- control laws. While progress toward curbing commerce in firearms continues, gun-control issues remain at the forefront of some midterm election campaigns, including Maryland, the central scene of the recent shootings. What's needed... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Christian Science Monitor

89

United States

11 October 2002

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Georgia), Opinion

A killer is on the loose in the Washington area, and once again, gun haters are using the Beltway shootings as an excuse for more gun control. Ballistic fingerprinting will hardly ever solve a crime, but it will accomplish something else — a gun registry tied to the owners of the guns. The latest weapon in the gun haters' arsenal is the registration of firearms. Specifically, they want to register the unique "ballistic fingerprint" that each firearm leaves on a... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Georgia)

147

United States

11 October 2002

New York Times

Michael Moore's new documentary, "Bowling for Columbine," rapturously greeted at the Cannes Film Festival in May, opens today in New York City and Los Angeles in an atmosphere of intense political polarization. Not that Mr. Moore, a cheerful rabble-rouser and author of the best seller "Stupid White Men," would have it any other way. But in times of political anxiety and global insecurity — most times, in other words — arguments have a tendency to turn into shouting... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: New York Times

149

United States

11 October 2002

Los Angeles Times

ROCKVILLE, Maryland — Ballistic tests confirmed Thursday that a Maryland man slain by a distant gunshot at a Virginia gas station was the ninth victim of the serial killer circling the Washington Beltway, police officials said. Northern Virginia police investigators said Dean Harold Meyers, 53, a civil engineer, was shot dead Wednesday night at a service station in Manassas as he stood near his gray Mazda. Prince William County police and federal firearms agents said... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Los Angeles Times

150

United States

11 October 2002

Associated Press

SEATTLE — A neighbor heard the late-night gunshots and saw the assassin hustle to his car, leaving behind spent shell casings and a dying federal prosecutor. But a year later, despite a high-profile investigation and the promise of a $1 million reward, the FBI doesn't know who killed Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Crane Wales, or why. The apparent lack of progress in the case has frustrated those who knew him. Wales, 49, was slain as he sat at a computer in the... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Associated Press

151

United States

11 October 2002

Tampa Tribune (Florida)

TAMPA, Florida — As a sniper stirs terror with each squeeze on the trigger of a high-power rifle in suburban Washington, authorities are hoping a national ballistic evidence database will lead them to the killer. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms' National Integrated Ballistic Information Network is a nationwide database designed to match rifling marks on bullets and bullet casings. Since its inception, at least 4,400 "hits," or matches, have provided... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Tampa Tribune (Florida)

290

United States

11 October 2002

New York Times

WASHINGTON — For the state of the art in personal firearms, few weapons can top the Robar RC-50. Though it weighs 25 pounds, it has few peers when it comes to accuracy. In steady and experienced hands, it can propel a devastating .50-caliber round into a helicopter or armored vehicle up to a mile away. The RC-50, which sells for about $5,000, is one of dozens of models of high-tech "precision" rifles that gun manufacturers are supplying — not only to soldiers and... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: New York Times

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