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Gun Policy News, 25 March 2000

Canada

25 March 2000

Toronto Star (Ontario)

"A disarmed people will never be a free people," intones Charlton Heston from the TV screen, in a half-hour "infomercial" for the National Rifle Association. England, Australia and South Africa are being subjected to creeping disarmament, he states, and then right next door, Canada — where long gun owners now are being required to register their weapons. Reform MP Art Hanger comes on screen to warn "they want every firearm seized in this country." Former Olympic... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

Washington Post

The state Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a proposal that would make Maryland the first state in the nation to require that all new handguns be sold with built-in locks. Beginning in 2003, all new handguns sold in Maryland would have to have built-in mechanical locks that opened by combination or with a key. Until then, Maryland would join four other states in mandating that new pistols and revolvers be sold with separate trigger locks. However, the... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

San Francisco Chronicle, Editorial

Sometimes it seems as if the National Rifle Association and other gun-rights groups have become parodies of themselves with their knee-jerk objections to efforts to curb gun violence. The NRA and the Virginia-based Gun Owners of America are howling about an agreement by Smith & Wesson, the largest U.S. manufacturer of handguns, to install gun locks on all weapons it sells. Smith & Wesson also plans to introduce "smart gun" technology that permits weapons to be fired... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

MSNBC

SPOKANE, Washington — The grudge match over firearms is getting personal as a major gun distributor drops Smith & Wesson products from its inventory, and Spokane gun dealers support the move. Many gun dealers say they're not willing to put up with Smith & Wesson's new, tighter restrictions that are part of an agreement with the federal government. Smith & Wesson says many of the regulations are designed to make it harder for criminals to buy guns, and to make guns... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

Los Angeles Times

Laura Kelly doesn't use the word "safe" these days without ironic intent. As in: "I moved out here so my son could be quote-unquote safe." Or: "This is quote-unquote the safest city in America, right?" Like others pushing for tough gun laws, Kelly has come to view safety as the great American illusion. If a psychotic can shoot up a day camp … if classrooms can be turned into slaughterhouses … if buying a gun isn't so much tougher than buying a bar of soap …... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

Washington Post

In an unusually vitriolic campaign, the National Rifle Association is seizing on the murder of a Georgia lawman-allegedly killed by 1960s militant Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin-to convince Americans that U.S. streets would be safer if the federal government pursued firearms violations more aggressively. Sheriff's Deputy Ricky Kinchen would be alive today, asserts NRA executive Wayne LaPierre, if federal prosecutors had filed a gun charge in 1995 against Al-Amin, formerly... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colorado — Weary of the attention — and wary of it, too — many Columbine High students want to observe the first anniversary of the shootings at the school quietly. But they may have to share their lingering grief with as many as 100,000 others. School district officials are planning for a crowd of that size on April 20, based on the turnout in Oklahoma City for the first anniversary of the 1995 bombing that left 168 dead. "We'd like to say it would... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States

25 March 2000

Associated Press

SOUTH KINGSTOWN, Rhode Island — When a bullet pierced the wall of the game room in her home and narrowly missed a 10-year-old boy's head, Dawn Ruel's first thought was: drive-by shooting. The bullet, however, was from a shooting range nearly a mile away. Stray bullets have found their way into garage and living room walls in the secluded subdivision of cul-de-sacs where Reul lives in the village of Peace Dale. No one has been hurt. Still, the town wants to... (GunPolicy.org)

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