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Armed violence prevention, gun control laws and the small arms trade:

Gun Policy News, 2 January 2000

United States

2 January 2000

Los Angeles Times, Opinion

On June 7, 1982, a heroin addict in his early 30s named Michael Fagan — later diagnosed by British doctors as schizophrenic and having suicidal tendencies — scaled a railing at Buckingham Palace, climbed up a drainpipe and entered a third-floor window. Fagan found a bottle of Australian wine given as a gift to the Prince of Wales. He drank half of it. A maid suddenly spotted him in a hallway and called security guards. By the time they got there, Fagan was gone. A... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Los Angeles Times

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United States

2 January 2000

Denver Rocky Mountain News (Colorado)

Gov. Bill Owens counts himself among the Coloradans jolted by the Columbine High School killings into rethinking the state's gun laws. Shortly before the worst school shooting in U.S. history, Owens was planning to sign legislation establishing statewide standards that would make it easier for people without criminal records to get permits to carry concealed weapons. That bill died along with other gun-related measures. Owens doesn't think concealed-carry legislation... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Denver Rocky Mountain News (Colorado)

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United States

2 January 2000

Reuters

WASHINGTON — The White House said on Sunday it would ask Congress for $10 million to help test and develop "smart guns" that could only be fired by their owners. The sum-part of a U.S. federal budget likely to exceed $1.8 trillion-is more than double the $4 million that President Clinton sought and failed to get from the Republican-led Congress last year. Handgun makers have begun experimenting with guns that, to fire, must recognize their owners' fingerprints or... (GunPolicy.org)

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10293

United States

2 January 2000

Reuters

LONDON — British-based "guns-to-buns" conglomerate Tomkins Plc has decided to sell its U.S. handgun maker Smith & Wesson, the Financial Mail on Sunday newspaper reported. Smith & Wesson, one of the oldest and most well-known small arms makers in the world, is the "guns" part of a conglomerate that includes a car parts manufacturer and a bread maker. The newspaper, citing sources close to the company, said the sale could raise as much as 100 million pounds ($161.6... (GunPolicy.org)

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