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Gun Policy News, 1 January 1999

United States

1 January 1999

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Charlton Heston is battling prostate cancer but says he is on the road to recovery after weeks of intense radiation treatments. "It's not totally gone, but it's on the path to it," the Academy Award-winning actor said Friday from his home in the Los Angeles Santa Monica Mountains. "Happily, I seemed to have survived. It's very good news." He said he found out about the cancer during his annual checkup and prostate screening in June. Doctors agreed to... (GunPolicy.org)

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Africa

1 January 1999

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

I nestled into my side corner seat in the cockpit, comfortably assured that I was not far from the evidence of illicit weapons in the back of the aircraft. As the plane-an old Britannia, a precursor to the modern jet-took off from the lakeside town of Kalemie in eastern Zaire, the French-speaking co-pilot and the British engineer were confident that our Belgian captain would safely navigate the short runway. I was an investigator on my way to a weapons depot near... (GunPolicy.org)

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United States,United Nations

1 January 1999

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

It's scary, sometimes, how civilised the conversations can be. Last fall at a Belgian government-sponsored meeting on the links between disarmament and development, a lobbyist for the National Rifle Association (NRA) asked me about my children and told me of his desire to have several grandchildren. Meanwhile, a gun-control advocate from South Africa told me that he and the lobbyist had discussed their mutual interest in rose gardening at an earlier meeting. So... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

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United Nations

1 January 1999

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

On Christmas Eve 1989, Charles Taylor marched into Liberia with a ragtag invasion force of some 150 amateur soldiers-members of the self-styled National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL)-and set out to conquer the country. In the months that followed, Taylor seized control of the Liberian hinterland, exacting tribute from its inhabitants, recruiting additional soldiers, and killing all who stood in his way. As many as 200,000 people died in the cataclysm, and millions... (GunPolicy.org)

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United Nations,United States

1 January 1999

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

Madeleine Albright does not like "the uncontrolled flow of arms, ammunition, and explosives into tense areas of the world." Twice recently-in September before a special U.N. Security Council session on Africa, and in November at a gathering of the International Rescue Committee-the U.S. secretary of state assailed the "unregulated and illegitimate sale" of small arms. (Excerpts from her November speech are on pages 30-31.) Secretary Albright's speeches may signify that... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

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United States

1 January 1999

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

Smith & Wesson, a Connecticut-based handgun manufacturer, used an exhibit of its wares at an April 1867 Paris exhibition to jump-start its sales in Europe. When the Russian government ordered 20,000 Model-3 .44 revolvers (which could be loaded and unloaded more rapidly than earlier guns), it spurred additional orders from rival nations. These European purchases helped Smith & Wesson weather the severe downturn in U.S. demand following the Civil War boom.At least since... (GunPolicy.org)

Read More: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Jan/Feb 1999; Vol. 55, No. 1

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