Citation(s) from the GunPolicy.org literature library

Mtonga, Robert. 2004 ‘Smuggling - Zambia.’ Hide and Seek: Taking Account of Small Arms in Southern Africa, p. 288. Pretoria: Institute for Security Studies. 1 October

Relevant contents

The conflict in the DRC has also stimulated gunrunning in neighbouring Zambian provinces. In August 2003, a traditional leader from Northern Province publicly called on the government to take action to prevent his subjects from trading firearms with the Congolese.(27)

Despite the absence of conflict in neighbouring Malawi, there are reports that firearms are illegally smuggled across the border between Zambia and Malawi. In 2003 the press reported the confiscation by police of hundreds of firearms from villagers in the Eastern Province's Chama District, which borders Malawi.(28)

Research at the Mwami border crossing, near Chipata in Eastern Province, suggested that poaching in the nearby South Luangwa National Park was rife, and that many local residents believed that large quantities of firearms and ammunition were being smuggled across the border from Malawi and Mozambique. It was also observed that the main ethnic group in the region, the Ngoni, have a warlike reputation, and many families are said to pass down firearms from generation to generation.(29)

[DRC = Democratic Republic of Congo]

Sources:

27) "Traditional ruler appeals to government to disarm his subjects," Times of Zambia, 20 August 2003.

28) "Police confiscate Firearms from villagers," Times of Zambia, 13 November 1999. See also Times of Zambia, 9 January 2003 and 8 June 2003

29) Interview with Dr Henry G. Phiri, grandson of Paramount Chief Gawa Undi of Eastern Province, 12 May 2003.

ID: Q8827

As many publishers change their links and archive their pages, the full-text version of this article may no longer be available from the original link. In this case, please go to the publisher's web site or use a search engine.