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UNHCHR. 2006 ‘Theft of Weapons.’ Report of the United Nations Independent Special Commission of Inquiry for Timor-Leste; Sections 98 and 99, pp. 41-2. Geneva: United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. 2 October

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Theft of Weapons

98.
A recent weapons audit conducted by an international team has found that 219 PNTL weapons remain outside PNTL custody and control. These weapons comprise 190 Glock 9 mm pistols, 13 Steyr semi-automatic assault rifles, 10 HK33 semi-automatic assault rifles, 2 FN-FNC semi-automatic assault rifles and 4 12-gauge shotguns. While PNTL records identify the last known signatory for the majority of these weapons, the habit of transferring weapons absent of either written orders or documentation about the chain of custody renders it impossible to determine the current whereabouts of these weapons.

99.
The Commission notes with concern the irregularities in the F-FDTL weapons holdings spanning several years. The baseline of 1,200 M16 weapons issued to F-FDTL by the Government is established by 2002 records. The recently conducted international weapons audit established that in February 2004 F-FDTL held 1,230 M16 weapons. The additional 30 weapons were not provided by the Government. By November 2005 the F-FDTL could account for only 1,073 M16 weapons. Although F-FDTL has stated that in 2006 they hold 1,200 M16 weapons, the records reveal that 45 M16 weapons are missing. Additionally, three FN-FNC semi-automatic rifles, three SKS semi-automatic rifles and two Uzi weapons previously within the custody and control of F-FDTL are missing. F-FDTL is also in possession of one Minimi, one .38 Special, one Browning 9 mm, two G3 semi-automatic rifles, one M16 A1 rifle and one M2 .50-calibre firearm, the provenance of which is unexplained. Also unexplained is the pedigree of 342 "ex-FALINTIL weapons" in the possession of F-FDTL.

ID: Q1284

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