Citation(s) from the GunPolicy.org literature library

SEESAC. 2005 ‘SALW Transfers - Republic of Montenegro.’ South Eastern Europe Small Arms and Light Weapons Monitor, 2005, p. 153. Belgrade: South Eastern Europe Clearinghouse for the Control of Small Arms and Light Weapons / SEESAC and Saferworld. 1 January

Relevant contents

SALW Transfers - Republic of Montenegro

Montenegro has, on numerous occasions, been revealed to be a transit point for illegal SALW. The Small Arms Survey notes Montenegro as a transhipment point for 'weapons smuggled from Serbia to the Middle East, from Russia to Libya, from the Balkans to Western Europe, and also as a regional transit point between Bosnia and Kosovo'.

At present, however, it appears that 'small arms trafficking across borders is becoming negligible in Montenegro' although trafficking in other contraband is increasing. A handful of small-scale seizures at the border were reported in 2003 and there is a 'strong consensus that the market is saturated with weapons.'

Notably, in the fist part of 2004, Montenegrin border guards recorded 43 confiscations of rifles and handguns as compared with 66.5 kg of marijuana, 215 motor vehicles, 36 vessels (mostly smugglers' boats), nearly 300,000 packs of cigarettes, 63.6 tons of coffee and almost €1 million in cash.'

In December 2004, individuals were arrested near Tirana, Albania with MANPADs that were apparently destined for Macedonia. According to numerous sources, the missiles had been brought across the border from Montenegro into Albania.

Since trafficking in items other than weapons, particularly in cigarettes, continues to be a significant problem in Montenegro, there exists a real danger that those illicit trafficking networks could easily be utilised for the purpose of renewed SALW trafficking if the demand should once again increase.

[SALW = Small arms and light weapons; MANPADs = Man-portable air-defense systems]

ID: Q4033

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